ECUADOR, Orellana Province. December 2015.  Horse grazing along oil pipelines in the El Auca road. The 60 miles long road was built in the 1970s by Texaco to move its drilling equipment to the deepest part of the Ecuadorian rainforest.

ECUADOR, Orellana Province. December 2015.

Horse grazing along oil pipelines in the El Auca road. The 60 miles long road was built in the 1970s by Texaco to move its drilling equipment to the deepest part of the Ecuadorian rainforest.

 ECUADOR, Puerto Francisco de Orellana. December, 2015.                   A man fishes on the banks of the river Payamino near the city of El Coca. While operating in the region Texaco dumped 18 million of gallons of toxic waste directly into the rivers and soil of the Ecuadorian rainforest. The pollution of water resources consequently damaged the vegetation, livestock and residents themselves. Many people of the region died of skin and stomach cancers. 

ECUADOR, Puerto Francisco de Orellana. December, 2015.                 

A man fishes on the banks of the river Payamino near the city of El Coca. While operating in the region Texaco dumped 18 million of gallons of toxic waste directly into the rivers and soil of the Ecuadorian rainforest. The pollution of water resources consequently damaged the vegetation, livestock and residents themselves. Many people of the region died of skin and stomach cancers. 

 ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. December, 2015.  A crude oil waste pit left by Texaco (now Chevron) at the end of its oil concession in Ecuador in 1992. A survey ordered by an Ecuadorian court established that more than 900 oil waste pits were constructed by Texaco whilst operating in the region.

ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. December, 2015.

A crude oil waste pit left by Texaco (now Chevron) at the end of its oil concession in Ecuador in 1992. A survey ordered by an Ecuadorian court established that more than 900 oil waste pits were constructed by Texaco whilst operating in the region.

 ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. December, 2015.  Donald Moncayo displays crude oil in his hands. The crude oil lays on an open waste pit left by Texaco. 

ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. December, 2015.

Donald Moncayo displays crude oil in his hands. The crude oil lays on an open waste pit left by Texaco. 

 ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. December 2015.  Donald Moncayo, activist and ally of Amazon Watch, stand on an oil 'pool' left by Texaco in 1992 (now Chevron). Donald, a member of the affected communities, dedicated his life to showing the world the environmental disaster left by Texaco. 

ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. December 2015.

Donald Moncayo, activist and ally of Amazon Watch, stand on an oil 'pool' left by Texaco in 1992 (now Chevron). Donald, a member of the affected communities, dedicated his life to showing the world the environmental disaster left by Texaco. 

 ECUADOR, Orellana Province. November 2015.  An aerial view of the suspension bridge over the Rio Napo in the city of Puerto Francisco de Orellana ( El Coca). The bridge connects the city of El Coca to the El Auca road, the oil exploration road built in the 1980s. 

ECUADOR, Orellana Province. November 2015.

An aerial view of the suspension bridge over the Rio Napo in the city of Puerto Francisco de Orellana ( El Coca). The bridge connects the city of El Coca to the El Auca road, the oil exploration road built in the 1980s. 

 ECUADOR, Orellana Province. November 2015.  People fish on the banks of the river Payamino near the city of Puerto Francisco de Orellana (El Coca). Texaco dumped 18 million of gallons of toxic waste directly into the rivers and soil of the Ecuadorian rainforest. The pollution of water resources consequently damaged the vegetation, livestock and residents themselves. Many people of the region died of skin and stomach cancers. 

ECUADOR, Orellana Province. November 2015.

People fish on the banks of the river Payamino near the city of Puerto Francisco de Orellana (El Coca). Texaco dumped 18 million of gallons of toxic waste directly into the rivers and soil of the Ecuadorian rainforest. The pollution of water resources consequently damaged the vegetation, livestock and residents themselves. Many people of the region died of skin and stomach cancers. 

 ECUADOR, Yasuni National Park. November 2015.  Numpo and her daughter Jemenca sit on a hammock inside a hut along the river Shiripuno in the Huaorani Reserve of the Yasuni Nation Park. With the construction of the El Auca road, an oil exploration road built in the 1980s during the oil boom of the region, the Huaorani tribe was pushed out and forced to move deeper in the rainforest. 

ECUADOR, Yasuni National Park. November 2015.

Numpo and her daughter Jemenca sit on a hammock inside a hut along the river Shiripuno in the Huaorani Reserve of the Yasuni Nation Park. With the construction of the El Auca road, an oil exploration road built in the 1980s during the oil boom of the region, the Huaorani tribe was pushed out and forced to move deeper in the rainforest. 

 ECUADOR, Orellana Province. November 2015.  An aerial view of the Rio Napo west of the city of El Coca. The Napo river is a tributary of the Amazon river. Texaco dumped 18 million of gallons of toxic waste directly into the rivers and soil of the Ecuadorian rainforest. The pollution of water resources consequently damaged the vegetation, livestock and residents themselves. 

ECUADOR, Orellana Province. November 2015.

An aerial view of the Rio Napo west of the city of El Coca. The Napo river is a tributary of the Amazon river. Texaco dumped 18 million of gallons of toxic waste directly into the rivers and soil of the Ecuadorian rainforest. The pollution of water resources consequently damaged the vegetation, livestock and residents themselves. 

 ECUADOR, Yasuni National Park. November 2015.  Juan Carlos Arvalado, a woodcutter and hunter, holds a rifle along the banks of the river Shiripuno. Texaco dumped 18 million of gallons of toxic waste directly into the rivers and soil of the Ecuadorian rainforest affecting hunting, fishing and consequently the lives of residents themselves.

ECUADOR, Yasuni National Park. November 2015.

Juan Carlos Arvalado, a woodcutter and hunter, holds a rifle along the banks of the river Shiripuno. Texaco dumped 18 million of gallons of toxic waste directly into the rivers and soil of the Ecuadorian rainforest affecting hunting, fishing and consequently the lives of residents themselves.

 ECUADOR, Yasuni National Park. November 2015.  Oil pipelines run along a bridge over the Shiripuno river in the Yasuni National Park. Oil pipelines run through the Ecuadorian rainforest to transport oil from pumping stations to oil developments. 

ECUADOR, Yasuni National Park. November 2015.

Oil pipelines run along a bridge over the Shiripuno river in the Yasuni National Park. Oil pipelines run through the Ecuadorian rainforest to transport oil from pumping stations to oil developments. 

 ECUADOR, Yasuni National Park. November 2015.  A Huaorani holds a piranha on the banks of the river Shiripuno. The pollution of water resources caused by Texaco over three decades of oil extraction damaged the vegetation, livestock and residents themselves. During the oil boom of the region the Huaorani tribe was pushed into the deepest parts of the Ecuadorian rainforest.

ECUADOR, Yasuni National Park. November 2015.

A Huaorani holds a piranha on the banks of the river Shiripuno. The pollution of water resources caused by Texaco over three decades of oil extraction damaged the vegetation, livestock and residents themselves. During the oil boom of the region the Huaorani tribe was pushed into the deepest parts of the Ecuadorian rainforest.

 ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. November 2015.  A contaminated river in the Lago Agrio Canton, Sucumbios Province. Texaco (Now Chevron) left Ecuador in 1992 leaving behind about 1000 open toxic waste pits or oil 'pools'. Toxic waste polluted rivers jeopardising the life of the communities populating the area depending on water for drinking, bathing and fishing. 

ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. November 2015.

A contaminated river in the Lago Agrio Canton, Sucumbios Province. Texaco (Now Chevron) left Ecuador in 1992 leaving behind about 1000 open toxic waste pits or oil 'pools'. Toxic waste polluted rivers jeopardising the life of the communities populating the area depending on water for drinking, bathing and fishing. 

 ECUADOR, Shushufindi, Lago Agrio. December 2015.  Alejandro Soto, 57, lived in Shushufindi in the Lago Agrio Canton for 42 years. His farm is surrounded by 'pools' of toxic wastes dumped by Texaco. His father died of stomach cancer in 1985. His brother suffered of Leukemia. Alejandro Soto is part of a group of families that sued Texaco in 1993 in a U.S federal court for environmental damage and damage to the health of the locals. 

ECUADOR, Shushufindi, Lago Agrio. December 2015.

Alejandro Soto, 57, lived in Shushufindi in the Lago Agrio Canton for 42 years. His farm is surrounded by 'pools' of toxic wastes dumped by Texaco. His father died of stomach cancer in 1985. His brother suffered of Leukemia. Alejandro Soto is part of a group of families that sued Texaco in 1993 in a U.S federal court for environmental damage and damage to the health of the locals. 

 ECUADOR, Orellana Province. November 2015.  An aerial view of Puerto Francisco de Orellana, known as El Coca. The city became the centre of the oil industry in the 1990s and its surrounded by oil developments. 

ECUADOR, Orellana Province. November 2015.

An aerial view of Puerto Francisco de Orellana, known as El Coca. The city became the centre of the oil industry in the 1990s and its surrounded by oil developments. 

 ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. December 2015.  Oil pipelines run through the Ecuadorian rainforest to transport oil from pumping stations to oil developments. Oil spillages contaminated rivers and soil of the region.

ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. December 2015.

Oil pipelines run through the Ecuadorian rainforest to transport oil from pumping stations to oil developments. Oil spillages contaminated rivers and soil of the region.

 ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. December 2015.  Workers of PetroEcuador, the national oil company, weekly check the oil pipelines running underground in order to prevent oil spillages. 

ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. December 2015.

Workers of PetroEcuador, the national oil company, weekly check the oil pipelines running underground in order to prevent oil spillages. 

 ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. December 2015.  Doña Mariana Jimenez, 76, inside her house. Mariana Jimenez had three abortions.  Drinking, bathing and fishing in contaminated rivers has led to stomach and skin cancers, abortions, infections and headaches. Mariana Jimenez is part of a group of families that sued Texaco in 1993 in a U.S federal court for environmental damage and damage to the health of the locals. 

ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. December 2015.

Doña Mariana Jimenez, 76, inside her house. Mariana Jimenez had three abortions.  Drinking, bathing and fishing in contaminated rivers has led to stomach and skin cancers, abortions, infections and headaches. Mariana Jimenez is part of a group of families that sued Texaco in 1993 in a U.S federal court for environmental damage and damage to the health of the locals. 

 ECUADOR, Sucumbios Province. December 2015.  Children wash clothes in a river in the Lago Agrio Canton. Drinking, bathing and fishing in contaminated rivers has led to stomach and skin cancers, abortions, infections and headaches. 

ECUADOR, Sucumbios Province. December 2015.

Children wash clothes in a river in the Lago Agrio Canton. Drinking, bathing and fishing in contaminated rivers has led to stomach and skin cancers, abortions, infections and headaches. 

 ECUADOR, Orellana Province. December, 2015.  Oil pipelines run along a bridge over the Shiripuni river on the side of a house. Oil pipelines run through the Ecuadorian rainforest to transport oil from pumping stations to oil developments. After the environmental disaster caused by Texaco, today oil companies continue building new oil pipelines and oil development in the Ecuadorian rainforest increasing the risk of contamination to the environment and residents themselves.

ECUADOR, Orellana Province. December, 2015.

Oil pipelines run along a bridge over the Shiripuni river on the side of a house. Oil pipelines run through the Ecuadorian rainforest to transport oil from pumping stations to oil developments. After the environmental disaster caused by Texaco, today oil companies continue building new oil pipelines and oil development in the Ecuadorian rainforest increasing the risk of contamination to the environment and residents themselves.

 ECUADOR, Orellana Province. December 2015.  Horse grazing along oil pipelines in the El Auca road. The 60 miles long road was built in the 1970s by Texaco to move its drilling equipment to the deepest part of the Ecuadorian rainforest.
 ECUADOR, Puerto Francisco de Orellana. December, 2015.                   A man fishes on the banks of the river Payamino near the city of El Coca. While operating in the region Texaco dumped 18 million of gallons of toxic waste directly into the rivers and soil of the Ecuadorian rainforest. The pollution of water resources consequently damaged the vegetation, livestock and residents themselves. Many people of the region died of skin and stomach cancers. 
 ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. December, 2015.  A crude oil waste pit left by Texaco (now Chevron) at the end of its oil concession in Ecuador in 1992. A survey ordered by an Ecuadorian court established that more than 900 oil waste pits were constructed by Texaco whilst operating in the region.
 ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. December, 2015.  Donald Moncayo displays crude oil in his hands. The crude oil lays on an open waste pit left by Texaco. 
 ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. December 2015.  Donald Moncayo, activist and ally of Amazon Watch, stand on an oil 'pool' left by Texaco in 1992 (now Chevron). Donald, a member of the affected communities, dedicated his life to showing the world the environmental disaster left by Texaco. 
 ECUADOR, Orellana Province. November 2015.  An aerial view of the suspension bridge over the Rio Napo in the city of Puerto Francisco de Orellana ( El Coca). The bridge connects the city of El Coca to the El Auca road, the oil exploration road built in the 1980s. 
 ECUADOR, Orellana Province. November 2015.  People fish on the banks of the river Payamino near the city of Puerto Francisco de Orellana (El Coca). Texaco dumped 18 million of gallons of toxic waste directly into the rivers and soil of the Ecuadorian rainforest. The pollution of water resources consequently damaged the vegetation, livestock and residents themselves. Many people of the region died of skin and stomach cancers. 
 ECUADOR, Yasuni National Park. November 2015.  Numpo and her daughter Jemenca sit on a hammock inside a hut along the river Shiripuno in the Huaorani Reserve of the Yasuni Nation Park. With the construction of the El Auca road, an oil exploration road built in the 1980s during the oil boom of the region, the Huaorani tribe was pushed out and forced to move deeper in the rainforest. 
 ECUADOR, Orellana Province. November 2015.  An aerial view of the Rio Napo west of the city of El Coca. The Napo river is a tributary of the Amazon river. Texaco dumped 18 million of gallons of toxic waste directly into the rivers and soil of the Ecuadorian rainforest. The pollution of water resources consequently damaged the vegetation, livestock and residents themselves. 
 ECUADOR, Yasuni National Park. November 2015.  Juan Carlos Arvalado, a woodcutter and hunter, holds a rifle along the banks of the river Shiripuno. Texaco dumped 18 million of gallons of toxic waste directly into the rivers and soil of the Ecuadorian rainforest affecting hunting, fishing and consequently the lives of residents themselves.
 ECUADOR, Yasuni National Park. November 2015.  Oil pipelines run along a bridge over the Shiripuno river in the Yasuni National Park. Oil pipelines run through the Ecuadorian rainforest to transport oil from pumping stations to oil developments. 
 ECUADOR, Yasuni National Park. November 2015.  A Huaorani holds a piranha on the banks of the river Shiripuno. The pollution of water resources caused by Texaco over three decades of oil extraction damaged the vegetation, livestock and residents themselves. During the oil boom of the region the Huaorani tribe was pushed into the deepest parts of the Ecuadorian rainforest.
 ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. November 2015.  A contaminated river in the Lago Agrio Canton, Sucumbios Province. Texaco (Now Chevron) left Ecuador in 1992 leaving behind about 1000 open toxic waste pits or oil 'pools'. Toxic waste polluted rivers jeopardising the life of the communities populating the area depending on water for drinking, bathing and fishing. 
 ECUADOR, Shushufindi, Lago Agrio. December 2015.  Alejandro Soto, 57, lived in Shushufindi in the Lago Agrio Canton for 42 years. His farm is surrounded by 'pools' of toxic wastes dumped by Texaco. His father died of stomach cancer in 1985. His brother suffered of Leukemia. Alejandro Soto is part of a group of families that sued Texaco in 1993 in a U.S federal court for environmental damage and damage to the health of the locals. 
 ECUADOR, Orellana Province. November 2015.  An aerial view of Puerto Francisco de Orellana, known as El Coca. The city became the centre of the oil industry in the 1990s and its surrounded by oil developments. 
 ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. December 2015.  Oil pipelines run through the Ecuadorian rainforest to transport oil from pumping stations to oil developments. Oil spillages contaminated rivers and soil of the region.
 ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. December 2015.  Workers of PetroEcuador, the national oil company, weekly check the oil pipelines running underground in order to prevent oil spillages. 
 ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. December 2015.  Doña Mariana Jimenez, 76, inside her house. Mariana Jimenez had three abortions.  Drinking, bathing and fishing in contaminated rivers has led to stomach and skin cancers, abortions, infections and headaches. Mariana Jimenez is part of a group of families that sued Texaco in 1993 in a U.S federal court for environmental damage and damage to the health of the locals. 
 ECUADOR, Sucumbios Province. December 2015.  Children wash clothes in a river in the Lago Agrio Canton. Drinking, bathing and fishing in contaminated rivers has led to stomach and skin cancers, abortions, infections and headaches. 
 ECUADOR, Orellana Province. December, 2015.  Oil pipelines run along a bridge over the Shiripuni river on the side of a house. Oil pipelines run through the Ecuadorian rainforest to transport oil from pumping stations to oil developments. After the environmental disaster caused by Texaco, today oil companies continue building new oil pipelines and oil development in the Ecuadorian rainforest increasing the risk of contamination to the environment and residents themselves.

ECUADOR, Orellana Province. December 2015.

Horse grazing along oil pipelines in the El Auca road. The 60 miles long road was built in the 1970s by Texaco to move its drilling equipment to the deepest part of the Ecuadorian rainforest.

ECUADOR, Puerto Francisco de Orellana. December, 2015.                 

A man fishes on the banks of the river Payamino near the city of El Coca. While operating in the region Texaco dumped 18 million of gallons of toxic waste directly into the rivers and soil of the Ecuadorian rainforest. The pollution of water resources consequently damaged the vegetation, livestock and residents themselves. Many people of the region died of skin and stomach cancers. 

ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. December, 2015.

A crude oil waste pit left by Texaco (now Chevron) at the end of its oil concession in Ecuador in 1992. A survey ordered by an Ecuadorian court established that more than 900 oil waste pits were constructed by Texaco whilst operating in the region.

ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. December, 2015.

Donald Moncayo displays crude oil in his hands. The crude oil lays on an open waste pit left by Texaco. 

ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. December 2015.

Donald Moncayo, activist and ally of Amazon Watch, stand on an oil 'pool' left by Texaco in 1992 (now Chevron). Donald, a member of the affected communities, dedicated his life to showing the world the environmental disaster left by Texaco. 

ECUADOR, Orellana Province. November 2015.

An aerial view of the suspension bridge over the Rio Napo in the city of Puerto Francisco de Orellana ( El Coca). The bridge connects the city of El Coca to the El Auca road, the oil exploration road built in the 1980s. 

ECUADOR, Orellana Province. November 2015.

People fish on the banks of the river Payamino near the city of Puerto Francisco de Orellana (El Coca). Texaco dumped 18 million of gallons of toxic waste directly into the rivers and soil of the Ecuadorian rainforest. The pollution of water resources consequently damaged the vegetation, livestock and residents themselves. Many people of the region died of skin and stomach cancers. 

ECUADOR, Yasuni National Park. November 2015.

Numpo and her daughter Jemenca sit on a hammock inside a hut along the river Shiripuno in the Huaorani Reserve of the Yasuni Nation Park. With the construction of the El Auca road, an oil exploration road built in the 1980s during the oil boom of the region, the Huaorani tribe was pushed out and forced to move deeper in the rainforest. 

ECUADOR, Orellana Province. November 2015.

An aerial view of the Rio Napo west of the city of El Coca. The Napo river is a tributary of the Amazon river. Texaco dumped 18 million of gallons of toxic waste directly into the rivers and soil of the Ecuadorian rainforest. The pollution of water resources consequently damaged the vegetation, livestock and residents themselves. 

ECUADOR, Yasuni National Park. November 2015.

Juan Carlos Arvalado, a woodcutter and hunter, holds a rifle along the banks of the river Shiripuno. Texaco dumped 18 million of gallons of toxic waste directly into the rivers and soil of the Ecuadorian rainforest affecting hunting, fishing and consequently the lives of residents themselves.

ECUADOR, Yasuni National Park. November 2015.

Oil pipelines run along a bridge over the Shiripuno river in the Yasuni National Park. Oil pipelines run through the Ecuadorian rainforest to transport oil from pumping stations to oil developments. 

ECUADOR, Yasuni National Park. November 2015.

A Huaorani holds a piranha on the banks of the river Shiripuno. The pollution of water resources caused by Texaco over three decades of oil extraction damaged the vegetation, livestock and residents themselves. During the oil boom of the region the Huaorani tribe was pushed into the deepest parts of the Ecuadorian rainforest.

ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. November 2015.

A contaminated river in the Lago Agrio Canton, Sucumbios Province. Texaco (Now Chevron) left Ecuador in 1992 leaving behind about 1000 open toxic waste pits or oil 'pools'. Toxic waste polluted rivers jeopardising the life of the communities populating the area depending on water for drinking, bathing and fishing. 

ECUADOR, Shushufindi, Lago Agrio. December 2015.

Alejandro Soto, 57, lived in Shushufindi in the Lago Agrio Canton for 42 years. His farm is surrounded by 'pools' of toxic wastes dumped by Texaco. His father died of stomach cancer in 1985. His brother suffered of Leukemia. Alejandro Soto is part of a group of families that sued Texaco in 1993 in a U.S federal court for environmental damage and damage to the health of the locals. 

ECUADOR, Orellana Province. November 2015.

An aerial view of Puerto Francisco de Orellana, known as El Coca. The city became the centre of the oil industry in the 1990s and its surrounded by oil developments. 

ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. December 2015.

Oil pipelines run through the Ecuadorian rainforest to transport oil from pumping stations to oil developments. Oil spillages contaminated rivers and soil of the region.

ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. December 2015.

Workers of PetroEcuador, the national oil company, weekly check the oil pipelines running underground in order to prevent oil spillages. 

ECUADOR, Lago Agrio. December 2015.

Doña Mariana Jimenez, 76, inside her house. Mariana Jimenez had three abortions.  Drinking, bathing and fishing in contaminated rivers has led to stomach and skin cancers, abortions, infections and headaches. Mariana Jimenez is part of a group of families that sued Texaco in 1993 in a U.S federal court for environmental damage and damage to the health of the locals. 

ECUADOR, Sucumbios Province. December 2015.

Children wash clothes in a river in the Lago Agrio Canton. Drinking, bathing and fishing in contaminated rivers has led to stomach and skin cancers, abortions, infections and headaches. 

ECUADOR, Orellana Province. December, 2015.

Oil pipelines run along a bridge over the Shiripuni river on the side of a house. Oil pipelines run through the Ecuadorian rainforest to transport oil from pumping stations to oil developments. After the environmental disaster caused by Texaco, today oil companies continue building new oil pipelines and oil development in the Ecuadorian rainforest increasing the risk of contamination to the environment and residents themselves.

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